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Learning New Skills

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chieflittlehorse

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Posts: 340

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:58 am

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Post Tue Jul 24, 2018 3:16 am

Learning New Skills

So I've been thinking that if I want to move more into Access Control work, I better start understanding how networks work.

I know of this guy on YouTube called Eli the Computer Guy.

He has some great videos of learning CCTV, Networking, and a whole bunch of other stuff.

Network Cables:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-azkafrgrw

I'm pretty proficient with using computers and such, making Excel spreadsheet formulas for Masterkeying is my forte. But I don't know too much about Networking software or hardware. I'm sure that in Access Control work you're going to be dealing with Local Area Networks, and a whole bunch of other computer related stuff, whether it be cabled or wireless.

So as of now I'm trying to put together some learning videos for myself and putting it on a Youtube playlist.

I'll share it with you guys once I'm done.

Best way to learn a new skill is also to teach it!

CLH!
You leave my GRAPHITE alone!!!
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Josephus

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Posts: 266

Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2013 11:30 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Thu Jul 26, 2018 6:54 pm

Re: Learning New Skills

How deep do you plan on going?

It's easy to spend lots of time learning things you don't need or aren't relevant.

Just spent six years finally getting a formal education in networking. Three degrees finished. I'm not even done, so I know about wasting time with networks :razz:

Physical access control install work is install and maybe proprietary software most of the time. Other people will take care of the rest. If you plan on doing stuff from scratch: vlans, switches, routers, some protocol types, ACL's, PoE, wireless concepts and setup, troubleshooting tools like ping, tracert, netstat; knowing how ports, packets, address space, subnetting, and firewalls work at some level. Those would present a good practical base. Models, best practices protocol documentation, RFCs, provide the theory and vendor independent specifics.

Get ready to learn how to search and read lots of dry stuff. Faster and more reliable than videos.

This is really a rabbit hole with no bottom. Lots of good access control installations can be integrated with Active Directory, typically run their software within a container or VM with the other infrastructure. Yeah. Rabbit hole. Figure out what you actually need.
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jeffmoss26

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Sargent Mossberg
Sargent Mossberg

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Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2010 2:21 am

Location: Cleveland, OH

Post Fri Jul 27, 2018 1:00 am

Re: Learning New Skills

IT/networking/telecom was my first hobby, it became my field of study, and then my career. I learned as much as I could both hands-on, in school, and from various mentors in the field.
Eli has some good videos. There is a ton of information out there. PM me if I can help in any way!
femurat: They're called restricted for a reason...
Innerpicked: The more keys you carry, the more important you look
GWiens2001: Great video! Learned a lot about what fun can be had with a forklift and a chainsaw.
pmaxey83: but i first have to submit the proper forms for a new hobby to my wife
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chieflittlehorse

Active Member

Posts: 340

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:58 am

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Post Fri Jul 27, 2018 4:25 am

Re: Learning New Skills

Well the reason in learning some new skills is this one company I want to apply at list these as their services.

Access Control System Installation
Access Control System Repair
Cable Installation
Cable Repair

So before I apply at this company I hope to get some general knowledge.

I'm just looking to work at a company where I won't get bored so much and get to work on many different things.

I just like learning about new things in locksmithing as it gets boring staying in the shop waiting for customers.

If we were a busy shop I wouldn't complain as it makes the time go by fast.

CLH!
Last edited by chieflittlehorse on Sat Aug 04, 2018 4:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
You leave my GRAPHITE alone!!!
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keyway_grooves

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Familiar Face

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Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:13 am

Post Sat Jul 28, 2018 5:31 am

Re: Learning New Skills

I think with some patience, technical skills have the benefit of a lot of crossover, where the same principles will be helpful in diverse cases. I did a bit more looking, and found that the Maxine Waters center I mentioned previously is part of a city-wide program called DACE. There are more locations viewable on their website (https://wearedace.org/school-locations/), including a school in north-ish LA that might be close enough for you to try:

East Los Angeles Occupational Center

ELECTRIC MOTOR CONTROLS
ELECTRICIAN/1: FUNDAMENTALS
ELECTRICIAN/2: WIRING AND CODES
ELECTRICIAN/3: WIRING TECHNIQUES
ELECTRICIAN/4: INDUSTRIAL

2100 Marengo St, Los Angeles, CA 90033
+1 323-276-7000
http://www.elaoc.net

Of the local classes I looked at (auto and electrical), they each lasted most of the day for about 6-8 weeks, and cost ranged from $120-$250 for one of the classes plus a $15 ID fee
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keyway_grooves

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Post Sat Jul 28, 2018 5:32 pm

Re: Learning New Skills

Networks are pretty high-level physical/wireless interfacing; I ordered a book about RFID that should bridge the lock devices and the key fobs and make signalling clear on the door level. FWIW, I think biological chip id insertion is a policy mistake and biometric scanning (a la Windows Hello) can already serve all intents and purposes (both law-abiding and law-abusing :???: ) of controlling the flow of money without stepping on conscientious objection to chip insertion
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Patrick Star

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Location: Sweden

Post Mon Jul 30, 2018 2:10 pm

Re: Learning New Skills

keyway_grooves wrote:Networks are pretty high-level physical/wireless interfacing; I ordered a book about RFID that should bridge the lock devices and the key fobs and make signalling clear on the door level. FWIW, I think biological chip id insertion is a policy mistake and biometric scanning (a la Windows Hello) can already serve all intents and purposes (both law-abiding and law-abusing :???: ) of controlling the flow of money without stepping on conscientious objection to chip insertion

Trying to learn electronic access control by studying the signalling of RFID would be like trying to learn locksmithing by studying Newtonian mechanics.
Totally wrong level of abstraction.
While I certainly don't advise against learning this, it's not anywhere near where you should actually begin.

And while I'm not up to speed on the access control systems used in the US, here the most common setup is that it simply reads the serial number of the RFID tag.
So the setup is identical both for different RFID standards (Mifare, EM Prox, etc) as well as magstripe/Wiegand cards, iButton fobs, etc.
I've even built a custom reader for low-security setups where you send it a text message and the phone number becomes the "card" number.

For offline setups (where the data on the card itself specifies what access should be granted) as well as proper high-security setups (typically this would be smartcard based since few RFID standards are anything resembling secure) you get into things like cryptographic key management, but it's still very high-level.
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keyway_grooves

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Post Thu Aug 16, 2018 4:33 am

Re: Learning New Skills

This may not apply to your case since you were looking to build skills to apply for a job rather than do your own business, but in the latter case there seems to be a required application and procurement of a California State Contractor's License to do serious access control installations here, as any locksmithing job running over $500 would require one beyond a regular CA locksmithing license:

"Note: If the company performs work at a single site that exceeds $500, a contractor's license is also required (C-28/C-61/D-16)"
https://www.bsis.ca.gov/forms_pubs/locksmith_fact.shtml
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Visitor

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Joined: Sat Sep 16, 2017 11:48 am

Post Thu Aug 16, 2018 5:04 am

Re: Learning New Skills

Normally on a supply and fit contract you would use off the shelf bits to make the system up, the software is already written, the circuits are already designed and made all you do is fit the hardware, load the software, install the cabling and make sure their IT guy knows how to use it. They are tested, proven units.
Often the manufacturer of these systems have a training option for fitting their equipment and as long as you have general competence in working on site that's all you really need.

I'm sure if you have the time, money and commitment of doing various courses in electrical safety, cable installation and other closely releated subjects it will certainly make you stand out from other people going for the same job or other companies in the book. Getting a contractors license really can't be a bad thing if it allows you to get more commercial work.

Going deeper in to the workings of such systems through the quest for knowledge can't be a bad thing either, i agree it might not be of much help in installing such systems but if you want to go down the route of making your own from scratch then surely it's a must however make sure of the certifying requirements where you live and I suspect make sure you have a very good insurance underwriter because if you're own designed system isn't fool proof you will certainly hear about it.

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