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Help!-Drilling holes in 1095 steel

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Bryanxwhite

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Posts: 160

Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2011 12:38 am

Location: Florida

Post Tue Jul 12, 2011 2:15 am

Re: Help!-Drilling holes in 1095 steel

I use www.reidsupply.com. They sell the 1095 individually, which was great because I only wanted to test it out and not commit to 12 pieces if they were shit. If they don't ship to you I'll gladly get some for you and send it your way. It's so much harder to work with, more sanding, more hours..but worth it in the end. I have a heavy hand sometimes and this stuff holds up well. I used to use .030 Starret(after polishing about .028) which I occasionally bent. The 1095 I got .025(about .023 after polishing)and still even thinner is stronger.
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piotr

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Posts: 738

Joined: Thu Nov 25, 2010 9:59 am

Location: Victoria, Australia

Post Tue Jul 12, 2011 11:17 am

Re: Help!-Drilling holes in 1095 steel

Bryanxwhite wrote:I use www.reidsupply.com. They sell the 1095 individually, which was great because I only wanted to test it out and not commit to 12 pieces if they were shit. If they don't ship to you I'll gladly get some for you and send it your way. It's so much harder to work with, more sanding, more hours..but worth it in the end. I have a heavy hand sometimes and this stuff holds up well. I used to use .030 Starret(after polishing about .028) which I occasionally bent. The 1095 I got .025(about .023 after polishing)and still even thinner is stronger.


Thanks. They do ship to Australia but the shopping cart can't calculate shipping so I'm unsure how much it will cost to ship. I have plenty of Starrett but when I use it up I will get some Precision.
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Licand

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Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2018 2:29 pm

Location: North Bergen,New Jersey

Post Fri Nov 09, 2018 3:00 pm

Re: Help!-Drilling holes in 1095 steel

I understand that I was a little late for the party, but I have some interesting observations that I want to share.

High speed steel is good for anything from wood to titanium, why titanium you ask...its beacuse the high speed steel takes te heat where carbide will cause work hardening and snap a drill very fast if the piece gets warm. Their are alot fo variables on this one but high speed steel is a great general purpose steel for drilling/milling


Cobalt~ cobalt is a very tough material but extremely brittle and when mixed with HSS it creates a very tough drill second only to carbide good for everything from wood to harder steels

Carbide~ there are many different types of carbide with micrograin carbide being the toughest and couple this with coarbonitrate titanium and other titanium coatings and you have a very formidable drill that is capable of drilling most any material, Concrete drills use carbide tips and hardened steel bodies with the carbide brazed on the body, this provides a very tough drill that can take the pounding and not chip out. Carbide drills are usually 3 times heavier than HSS

Diamond~ Diamond is used for cutting concrete and for holding tight tolerances in high speed machining of aluminum and softer metals, When i was at 3M they actually invented a machine that makes industrial grade diamonds, it was so efficient that GE asked them to stop producing diamonds. The Machine that looks like a alien bomb still sits in a dusty room to this day at 3M's center in Oakdale MN. Diamond or diabide is coated onto drills and adds a very thin layer of diamond buildup that last a long time in abrasive conditions. Diabide cannot take heat and the coating crumbles off when cutting harder metals.....its kind of a bummer we can use diamond on our cutters but cant cut anything hard. Also industrial diamonds are used on concrete blades and are visible by little black dots and raised dots on the blade.

Drills come in many different sizes and qualities with chinese drills leading the pack of cheap disposable drills that dont hold an edge very long, so is true for carbide and cobalt drills, you get what you pay for..usually if you go to JandLindustrial.com theylists all their tools as either import or domestic. Machinists know the difference between import and domestic tooling` Import tooling wears out too fast but is a great substitute when setting up a production job where you may break a tool or 2.

Also drill technology has come a long way, companies likeAllied offer a psade drill bits https://mechanicguides.com/best-cobalt-drill-bit-sets/ that takes a insert made out of micrograin carbide and coated for the application. these drills are sweet but arent for your average consumer. Here is a little info if you are going to sharpen your own drills at home

1. 118 degrees is your standard drill tip angle
2. 135 degrees is usually used on a split point drill where you are not using a center drill to start the hole.
3. Keep in mind the relief on the top of the drill and on the side!!
4. Drills usually are only sharpened 8-10 times in a machine shop as the inner web gets thicker and is tapered the drill looses alot of efficiency
5. Drills are also prone to the side flutes wearing, it is possible to resharpen a drill and it may look good but not leave a good finish in thehole or leave a galled or reduced diameter.
6. Remeber that you can sharpen a drill back to spec but if you spin the drill in your chuck youve probly damaged the shank and the drill will not hold a on center rotation with a damaged shank.


good luck with your drills guys and if your hand drilling with a old drill make sure your bracing yourself or slow down at the end of the hole

All the best,guys
Last edited by Licand on Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Jaakko Fagerlund

Active Member

Posts: 381

Joined: Mon Jan 06, 2014 3:55 pm

Location: Finland

Post Sat Nov 10, 2018 9:49 am

Re: Help!-Drilling holes in 1095 steel

piotr, nice way of being an ass and wrong at the same time. Material being "tool steel" doesn't affect the HSS ability to cut it, it is only the hardness and the actual material properties. A HSS drill hardness is way higher than any feeler gauge, but you do have to know how to use and sharpen the drill properly to be able to pull this off.

Licand, great explanations, but many points are wrong or just misconceptions, especially in the numbered list.

Just for the record in case someone doesn't know me, I'm a tool & die maker in my daily life and do this shit day in day out and also own a safe opening business.
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