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How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

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Run4yourlife24x

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Location: PA

Post Sat Mar 22, 2008 4:35 pm

How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

First off Bumping is mainly timing, pressure, and force. When you apply all of these at the right degree, the lock will open.

1. Timing: This is when you want to apply turning pressure to the key. Try to rest your finger on the key with no tension, but the instant the bump hammer hits the key, apply a small amount of pressure. Not to much or to little, more details later.

2. Pressure: This is how much pressure you want to apply turning the key. I usual start light, and increase. Never apply to much pressure or your key will break, or bend.

3. Force: This how hard you wanna hit the key. Never slam the key, it will just bend the key. Start light, and increase force, till you find a good amount. Some locks will respond better to very light force, some will require mildly harder taps.

Additional Tips:

You must combine all three of the above factors for success.

A bump hammer will increase your success, by alot.

Steel Blanks work best, due to not deforming over time. (Credit To JoshuaCodyWilson, on this tip.)
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Josh

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Post Tue Mar 25, 2008 7:53 pm

Re: Bumping Tips

dont forget to mention about key blank types.
most are made of brass and they tend to bend and such. but the best would be a steel blank. and pressure needs to be varied if you make the key with a dremel. if you heat the key up too much with the dremel, then you risk it loosing its temper.

just something to keep in mind ;)
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Site Admin

Post Tue Mar 25, 2008 8:10 pm

Re: Bumping Tips

yeah good point, when making your bump key i would recomend using a brass key as it is easier to file and shape, when you have finished it have it duplicated onto a steel blank so it dosent deform so easily, same apply's if you've had it made for you, E.G depth keys on ebay will usually be cut on a brass key to save his machine any wear so do be carefull :D
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WOT

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Post Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:57 pm

Re: Bumping Tips

Steel keys?! Unless you have a CW-14MCC, which I want to get, that's how you ruin your cutter in one shot.

Steel blanks are rare. The only ones I have are 35-101 L Schlage L in stainless steel and I haven't cut a single one of them due to lack of means to cut them.
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Site Admin

Post Sat Apr 19, 2008 4:54 pm

Re: How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

i wouldn't say their rare at all, all my bunp keys are cut onto steel and alot of euro profiles come with them as standard here, but as you so rightly said they will screw your wheel up no end so be carfull, by the way welcome to the board :)
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ChipShuhart

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Post Sat Apr 19, 2008 7:07 pm

Re: How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

I've never seen a steel key in my life. I have a huge tupperware container FULL of keys and none of them are steel. They are all different types of brass, some nickle plated, and one aluminum, but no steel keys. But why would you want to use a steel bump key for a lock that is made of brass? When materials of different hardness rub against eachother, the softer material will wear down; there is no avoiding it. Brass locks are meant to be used with brass keys to avoid damage, so when using a bump key you sure wouldn't want to use anything harder than that. Think about it, people complain that brass bump keys wear down too fast, but what do you think is happening to the brass inside the lock? The same exact thing. Now use an even harder bump key, and now what do you think is happening inside the lock? The key is no longer wearing down because the lock is taking all the damage.

Personally I'm happy with brass bump keys. I hardly ever use them so they don't wear down, but if they ever do I will just make more. Just my 2 cents
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WOT

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Post Sat Apr 19, 2008 8:00 pm

Re: How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

Lockylew wrote:i wouldn't say their rare at all, all my bunp keys are cut onto steel and alot of euro profiles come with them as standard here, but as you so rightly said they will screw your wheel up no end so be carfull, by the way welcome to the board :)


What do you use to cut steel keys?

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Left: generic nickel silver Schlage L, middle: generic nickel plated brass Best master, right: factory Schlage L, stainless steel.
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crazy

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Post Sat Apr 19, 2008 11:35 pm

Re: How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

Excelent recommendations. Thanks guys :mrgreen:
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Site Admin

Post Sun Apr 20, 2008 3:31 am

Re: How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

i don't cut my own, i have a good friend who cuts them for me
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WOT

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Post Sun Apr 20, 2008 7:38 pm

Re: How To: Bump Pin Tumblers

Romstar wrote:While the majority of keys are in fact brass, or nickel plated brass, there are a huge number of steel blanks available if you care to look for them.

They are not commonly used for two obvious reasons. The first being cost, and the second being the difficulty in cutting them.

The best options for bump keys are probably nickel plated brass, from a good quality maker such as Ilco.

Romstar


Ferrous metal is common for flat safe deposit box keys and tubular keys, but I haven't seen it used for keys to common pin & tumbler locks. The only exception is Schlage L master key blank, however as far as I know, only the Schlage branded L is stainless steel and they strongly recommend you order it precut from factory. All third party after market L master key blanks are brass or nickel silver.

nickel plated brass and regular brass are the samething, except the cosmetic finish. Most light duty keys are made of brass, such as cabinet lock keys, residential keys (SC1, KW1).

Keys to commercial locks are usually made of nickel silver. Ilco makes cheaper SC1 in both average user version brass and commercial user version nickel silver, which is more resistant to wear.

Most original tubular keys for bicycle locks, elevator switches, vending machines, etc are steel and Ilco makes the 1137S blank which is steel, as well as locksmith friendly 1137B, which is brass.

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