FAQ  •  My feedback  •  Feedback
UKLockpickers.co.uk Lockpicking supplies such as Lockpicks, tools, and more! COMMANDOLOCK.COM Military grade padlock systems lockpickshop.com A source for lockpicking supplies such as lockpicks, locksmith tools, and more!

Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Fri Jul 25, 2014 7:12 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

flywheel wrote:So that's what my locks would look like if I cleaned them up. I wonder if that would increase their trade-ability.
CPT1911 wrote:....all of your locks appear to be cleaned and lubricated before you begin.
I assume you disassemble, detail clean, and then re-lube and reassemble?
What products/process do you use to clean out the gunk?....

Cleaning locks can sometimes turn into a very tedious process (for me anyway)... but very gratifying.
Also, I put an insane amount of time into each lock I mount, and don't plan on ever taking them back off
unless I absolutely have to for some reason. So I figure it's gonna be my only chance to thoroughly service it.

Image

Basically, it is safe to clean/scrub/rinse EVERY part of a safe lock. The only thing is....
be certain to immediately & THOROUGHLY scrub & rinse any chemical back off each piece.
Also be absolutely certain that each piece is THOROUGHLY dried before lubing & reassembling.


Degreaser: You have to be somewhat careful since it's quite potent. But for the most part it's pretty safe on most surfaces as long as it's not prolonged exposure. Here we're just scrubbing with it then rinsing it right back off though, so no big worries. Never use it full strength - there's no need really. Even a half & half ratio is more than needed. You can see I have a couple of mixtures there. A 1:4 ratio is the darker one for heavier degreasing. The other one is even more diluted than that. Only one word of caution: Sometimes the paint on certain dials/dial rings (lines & #'s) won't take kindly to it. I once washed the #'s and lines right off a dial, lol. Another time, the white paint on a black plastic dial quickly began to fade. So if you're ever in doubt, I'd just suggest using soap & water on these two pieces.

Brasso: Drive cam, wheel post, wheels, flys, spacers, lever arm, bolt - there's usually a fair number of parts comprised of either brass or bronze. One of the things I like about Brasso is that it not only brightens but polishes - so I tend to think it leaves surfaces a bit smoother. Again, just be sure to remove ALL residue through brushing & rinsing.

NEVR-DULL Wadding Polish: Great for certain dials & dial rings. Like this one.
It leaves an oily residue though... so after using it, I use the degreaser AGAIN.

Can of compressed air: I LOVE the shit. Use it for all sorts of things. Helps to get excess water out to kickstart the drying process.



p.s. Since the start of this thread, I've had a number of people wonder about the cleaning process.
Sorry for such a delayed response... but this should give you at least an idea as to what I do anyway.
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

CPT1911

Familiar Face

Posts: 170

Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2013 4:05 pm

Location: Texas

Post Tue Aug 05, 2014 6:31 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Mike! Loved the technique you used to place the gate at 16 on the correct wheel. Before I got to the explanation of what you chose to do, I thought to myself "park W1 on 16 and BF W2. If it doesn't work, park W2 on 16 and BF1 to open." That would definitely have been slower! I really liked what you chose to do here.

I have ALMOST the same lock--my fence and cam are a polycarbonate material. Honestly man, I've never successfully opened it. The combination of a "soft" landing of the plastic on plastic cam to nose contact, and the friction plug that always gives me trouble, has left this Mosler unopened after at least a combined 8 hours of work. :???:

First post in a while....how appropriate it would be on the thread that got me started!

Trevor
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Thu Aug 07, 2014 6:43 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Parking is not an art I'm all to good with yet, lol. But yeah, I figured parking
quarterly would be a pretty sure bet that the lock would feed me something.

But as you know, I've delved back into the "LaGard Project" recently....
so I'm getting far more experience with parking than I'd ever want to. lol

Good to see ya. I know we've both been very busy.
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Thu Apr 02, 2015 1:18 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Haven't posted to the chronicles in awhile, but I'm still at it guys! In fact, I've been playing with safe locks for about 3 years now.
So I thought it was time to treat myself to a few tools I've been wanting from the start (but have gotten by just fine without them)

Image

DRAT (dial ring alignment tool) - Works with S&G, Mosler, IIco, LaGard, & some others probably.
Aeroshell 22 grease - S&G recommends it and their locks come from factory lubed with this.
K-18 KEEDEX - Assortment of change keys for combo changes on most major brands.
Low-end safe & vault amp - should help alot with diagnostics and manipulation.
And I finally, finally bought myself some new spline keys. A buck a piece.

To celebrate my new toys... a freshly mounted lock :)
Installed with my drat & lubed with Aeroshell.
Let's give it a quick spin, shall we?!
manipulation #21


Sargent & Greenleaf
6700 Series

Group2 ... 3 wheel ... key change ... spring loaded fence


Image Image

CONTACT AREA
Approximately 11 incs wide
LCP 5 . . . . . RCP 16

ROTATIONAL CONVERSION
pick-up differences for wheels 3, 2, 1
.7 .... 1.2 .... 1.5 .... respectively

Image

As always, I recreate my original free-spin opening so we have some graphs to look at.

READINGS
RIGHT contact point ONLY
...taken in tenths every 2 increments

UNKNOWN COMBO
L95 - R21 - L45

Even though this lock is in great shape, the CP's were a little odd/mushy. It's hard to explain,
but I've encountered this with a few different locks (even brand new ones). Again, it's difficult
to put into words; but if the lever nose makes too much contact, it sends the cam into a sort
of 2-axis/angled wobble. Probably makes no since at all to you, lol, but it's the best I can do.

Nevertheless, a very light touch revealed everything in just one all wheels right revolution.

Image

Two apparent gates: 45 & 21.5 -- a semi-suspect low area spanning from 75-60 -- and the brief but promising dip at 92.
If there were ever a good scenario for using some test combos to arrive at a faster opening... this would be it!
But that's not what I did. Instead, I opted to tag the two obvious gates to their respective wheels.

Image
* 3 actions compiled on one graph

I suspected 45 was likely w3. And 21.5 belonged to w2. Obviously we can't just assume...
but we can maximize our movements by attempting to validate the most likely things first.
I prefer to tag gates through isolation when possible. I utilized both areas for parking.

* Leaving wheels 1&2 @ 21.5, I bring w3 through 45. The drop indeed occurs.
* Leaving wheels 1&3 @ 45.5, I then bring w2 through 21. No doubt remains.

:???: - R21.5 - L45.5

* The search (or brute force rather) for w1 starts @ 90

OPEN L96 - R21.5 - L45.5

There was a time (not long ago) I would have jumped and ran with the first indication I found.
Potentially costing me many, many more readings and rotations. Much more time.
Sometimes it pays to stay the course and finish out a full rotation.
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

wrench214

User avatar

I've Been Banned!!
I've Been Banned!!

Posts: 16

Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2015 9:08 am

Location: Texas

Post Thu Apr 02, 2015 5:51 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

be careful with that degreaser, water it down before use, and wear a mask, that shit will clean up caustic material, rust, oil, grease, and anything else, it WILL eat away at your skin so wear latex gloves... the thick black kind, and it will blind you if it gets in your eyes. ( i built water purification rigs for the oil fields for a whopping 3 months, and we went through that shit like water.)
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Thu Apr 02, 2015 4:03 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Good warnings from Wrench. Yes, this stuff is potent.
Even a highly diluted mixture is still very effective.

As I mentioned, my only caution is using it on the dial ring & dial face.
If you're ever in doubt at all, just use soap and water on those pieces.
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Wed Apr 22, 2015 3:31 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Special thanks to....

Mastersmith, who I've thanked multiple times both publicly & personally - but I'll say it AGAIN.
Your generosity to share this pass-along with all of us here at Keypicking has changed my life.
It allowed me to begin teaching myself manipulation & enter into the wonderful world of safes.
I'll never forget the day it arrived on my doorstep 3 1/2 years ago. Pure enjoyment ever since.

Sometimes we do little things having no idea the profound affect it may have on someone.
Well that's precisely what has happened here. Thank you Mark. It all started with you.

Altashot and his colleagues for confirming this beautiful lock as a Mosler. As well as some very
interesting info on old antique locks - the craftsmanship, the surprising degree of precision,
and the intensive hands-on approach that was used for assembling each and every one.

I also want to thank you for always finding the time for me and my questions.
And I know you do not always have the time.... but you somehow make time.
20+ yrs of hard earned knowledge & experience in your field. A true passion
for what you do. And equally passionate about helping & sharing what you
have learned. An absolute rarity in my book. One I do not take for granted.


manipulation #22

Mosler

Group2 ... 3 wheel ... hole change ... spring-loaded fence

Image Image

So I went a little overboard on the photos. And for that I will say
to some of you... I'm sorry :???: And to others... you're welcome :mrgreen:

Image

I decided to service only the insides of this one... leaving the original 'aged beauty' on the outside untouched.

Image

Dial ring goes on the tube, followed by the tube nut that firmly presses the dial ring against the face of the door.

Image Image Image

One of the reasons this lock first caught my eye - Muskegon is a town not all too far from me.
L.C. Walker and his son Shaw Walker were/are big names in that town. Their company, started
in 1899, was geared toward businesses. Office supplies, equipment, and record keeping systems.

Altashot (on his way out the door of the shop) took a quick look at his files for me and was able to
confirm that the company did indeed make fire resistant file cabinets and possibly safes as well.
It's unclear whether they made locks. But my guess is that Mosler was commissioned for the
locks that would then be fitted to these safes and/or filing cabinets. But again, I'm not sure.

Image . . Image

Before fully assembling I wanted to give you a couple shots of the re-locker in this one.
At first glance it struck me as a bit 'crude'. Nevertheless, it does its' job quite effectively.

Image

A thin strip of metal with a slight upward bend. Mounted to the lock case by two rivets.

Image

Several views of the bolt and the area that's been modified to accept the re-locker.

Image
Notice the tab on the edge that's been cut/punched downward.
Image
And on the underside, a notch was created by filing along side this tab.
Image


I wanted to picture the wheels and #'s in their entirety for future reference. But I also thought
some of you mathematical number-figuring-freaks might enjoy it, lol. The choice & placement
of numbers is far from random. The sequence of the numbers and which ones are excluded
on each wheel need to be considered in order to account for a variety of things. Like where
the gate lies, maximizing keyspace, pickup differences, protecting the forbidden zone, etc.

These wheels are known as hole change. Similar to the mesh change type, the wheel pack
must be disassembled in order to change the number for each wheel, then reassembled.

Image

A flip-sided view of w2 with its' corresponding drive pin spacer inserted.
Serving a dual purpose, 1) its' orientation dictates the combination,
and 2) also serves as a drive pin on either side of each wheel.

Image

Image
The width of these stationary drive pins as they progressively stack upon each other
can create for some very large pickup differences (that I was not accustom to!) lol
e.g. The rotational difference for wheel 1 becomes a whopping 17.5 increments.


...and in a very large world... a small stack of joy.
Image

CONTACT AREA
Approximately 17 incs wide
LCP 18 . . . . . RCP 35

ROTATIONAL CONVERSION
pickup differences for wheels 3, 2, 1
6.5 .... 12.5 .... 17.5 .... respectively

READINGS
LEFT contact point ONLY
...taken in tenths every 2 incs

BINDING ORDER
2 - 1 - 3
UNKNOWN COMBO
R9 - L46 - R88

It wasn't long into this spin that I quickly acquired a new found respect for those of you
who tackle some of these old locks in the field. I definitely underestimated this one. lol

At times, readings required a very light touch. Pulling the dial out gave me better results.
There were also times when wheel(s) lifted the fence off the cam enough to where I was
unable to determine an exact reading. These areas are marked with an X on my graphs.

Also, due to the large pickup differences you'll see unmarked areas in the graphs.
Either within the contact area, or where it would cause other wheels to be disturbed.

Reading in tenths on this dial meant the differences were excruciatingly minute.
It was sometimes quite a debate between tagging a reading as 7 or 8 tenths, etc.
So although these graphs may seem fairly clear and definitive...... don't be fooled.

Image

The all wheels right rotation reveals a gate, 57. I first attempt to tag this gate through isolation...
but the enormous pickup differences really put a crimp in my style here. I'll have to work on that.

I revert to a high test. Realize too, the large pickup differences of 17.5, 12.5, and 6.5.
So as I throw each wheel up from 57 to 60, I'm moving them much more than 3 incs.

AWR @ 57 . . . 18.9
R57 R57 L60 . . . . . 18.9
R57 L60 R57 . . . . . 18.7
L60 R57 R57 . . . . . 18.7

Not quite what I had hoped. The test equally indicates both wheels 1 & 2.

I tried one other thing before moving on. But by no means is this fool-proof either.
The idea is to utilize the large rotational differences of each wheel to tag this gate.

57 was originally found with right rotation. I run all wheels left starting about 20 incs prior to it.
IF a gate shows up & corresponds to one of the pickup differences it might at least provide a clue.
If a gate occurs about 17.5 incs prior to 57... it's w1. 12.5 incs before 57... w2. 6.5 incs before 57... w3.

Image

The glimpse of a gate does appear around 45. Evidence of w2 being the rightful owner seems to be mounting.
But regardless of whether I can definitively tag wheel 1 or 2... my next action would be the same; run wheel 3.

Image

W3 has nothing to say. So I roll on the assumption that 57 is w2.
Time to run wheel 1 by itself while placing wheels 2&3 at 57.

Image

Here's a gate that could go unnoticed if you're not paying attention!
Readings spike slightly at 88, then never drop back down again.

Looking back on my previous graphs, I can safely figure the gates to be
at least 3 increments wide (maybe even 4). From the initial spike at 88,
I decide to go one increment in from there and chose 89 as the gate.

L89 - R57 - :???:

With known gates for wheels 1&2, it's time to run w3 for the money.

Image

W3's gate very obvious. And the fence desperately wanted to drop in... but not quite there.
We need to re-work w1. Remember the spike in readings that never dropped back down?
Pushing w1 from 89 up to 90, and.... OPEN: L90 - R57 - L82.5

The correct dialing procedure for this particular lock is of a RLR configuration though.
Working a wheel at a time allows me to find the true center of each gate. I can then
apply the pickup differences to convert the rotations & arrive at the original combo.
R9 - L46 - R88


. . . . . . . . . CONCLUSIONS . . . . . . . . .
In short, I have more manipulations to run through this lock & ALOT more homework to do. lol
I'm sure there's some holes in my game. Please feel free to point them out! I'd love to know!

I'd have to say my biggest obstacle with this lock may be the large pickup differences.
But with time I'd imagine they'll become less of a hindrance and more helpful instead.

The RCP that was ignored throughout this manipulation: During my first AWR graph
I initially was taking BOTH contact points (not pictured). I found the RCP to be non -
existent for a good portion of the dial. However, as subtle & illusive as it is, keeping
tabs on it may prove useful. Its' sudden appearance could help light the way.
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

Squelchtone

Active Member

Posts: 336

Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 7:16 pm

Location: Springfield MA USA

Post Wed Apr 22, 2015 5:03 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Oldfast,

Beautiful photos as always and what an adventure following along with your write up! I'm working on an old Mosler roller fence / friction fence 4 wheel lock, and I dont even want to show you my terrible graph, but you're motivating me to try harder and get better readings.

very enjoyable post, thank you!
Squelchtone
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Wed Apr 22, 2015 10:29 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Squelch! Haven't heard from ya in a bit, but I knew you were hard at it.
The one you're currently working on sure sounds like it could be difficult.

I know you've been collecting and working with older locks. I'm jealous.
I'd love to get my hands on more older ones! I've passed on a lot of 'em
though over the last couple years. $30 is usually about the max I'll spend on
a safe lock... which really limits my options when it comes to the antique ones
which normally carry higher price tags. I splurged a bit on this one and spent
$31.50. LOL. I just might have to start setting my max a bit higher maybe.

I haven't been over to lp101 in bit. I should stop by to see if there's any new
safe lock porn. Have you posted many pics of your safe collection there?

Thanks for the kind words and following along. Always appreciated.
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

Altashot

Active Member

Posts: 423

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 2:32 am

Location: Western Canada

Post Thu Apr 23, 2015 2:17 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

As always Oldfast, This write up was a pleasure to read. It's like poetry man,
I can tell you have the passion...

Glad to see this baby installed and working. looks good.
Love the way you figured it all out too. Nice to have another one mastered eh!
I'm also glad it wasn't too easy for you and your new found respect, them old locks can put on a good fight.

If you can find yourself a good old JJ Taylor, you'd find it great too.
Really heavy duty but also really touchy...Lots of fun...

M.
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Fri Apr 24, 2015 11:21 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Always, always, always a pleasure to have you along for the ride Altashot.

Oh, I so look forward to encountering some old beasts that really stick it to me.

Frustrating as they will be I'm sure, I'm up for it. In fact, I'd imagine after spending time with some of these older beauties,
the modern day locks may even be a bit easier (some of them anyway). I mean shit, their gate sigs are like grand canyons
sometimes in comparison to the gate signatures on some of the old antique locks. lol
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

Oldfast

User avatar

OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer
OldddffAASSTT the Spin Master Extraordinaire and American Lock Slayer

Posts: 4409

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:16 pm

Location: Michigan

Post Fri Jun 19, 2015 5:25 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

After some years of spinning my interest has now shifted toward acquiring & experiencing old locks.
There's a huge variety to be explored here. Unfortunately, the vintage/antique aspect of these locks
usually results in a rather high price tag. One that is still a little difficult for me to justify at this time.

But then outta the blue, Riyame gives me this!!!
Taken from a bank somewhere in Illinois.
Estimated to be around 80-100+ yrs old.

Your generosity blows my mind & warms my heart.
It really does. Thank you so very much Eric. Truly.

Special thanks to GWiens2001 for shipping this on
Riy's behalf. Great packing job too my friend! And
to Altashot for some helpful advice along the way.



So with this gift comes....
manipulation #23

Sargent & Greenleaf . . 6830

Group2 ... 3 wheel ... mesh change ... drop lever

I really enjoyed the several evenings it took to clean & fix this one up.
Many years of accumulated grease were initially removed using Q-tips, toothpicks, & rags.
I then used soap & water on some of the pieces, and a diluted degreaser on others. Much to my
surprise, my degreaser had a 'bluing' affect on some of the parts (particularly the flys & drive cam).
I suppose this old brass is likely comprised of a slightly different ratio of copper/zinc than todays' brass.

Image

I had hoped to leave the beautiful patina and refrain from using any Brasso this time.
But in the end, the spacers and the inner hubs fell victim to the ol' Brasso treatment.

Image Image

And lastly, I had to address a severely bent drive cam. Undoubtedly resulting from the removal of the lock.
Someone had attempted to pry it off - leaving a bend & two protruding notches on the outer-circumference.
And, once again, Altashot comes through with some helpful thoughts as to how to tackle it. In the end I was
able to bring it back to nearly true without any additional damage. Then filed/sanded the nubs off the edge.

Image . . . Image

I debated for a good while over the stand for this beautiful old lock.
Out of my current selection of spray paints, none seemed to fit.
Shopping around, I finally settled on a textured deep green.
I'm glad I waited. It really compliments the lock I think.

Image

With the back cover plate removed, there's several features that are new to me:
A revolving bolt (opposed to the normal throw/slide bolt). Attached to it, a drop lever
that works on gravity rather than being spring loaded. And notice the gate that can be
seen on w3. The gates, I believe, were originally straight-walled. The angled/flared out
sides appear to have been hand-filed later. You'll see my graphs reflect these extra wide
gates. Maybe this was to make the lock more forgiving for the end user? When all was said
& done, I found gates to be appoximately 5-6 incs wide... giving us a tolerance of +/- 2.5 incs.


'and in a very large world... a small stack of joy '

Image


CONTACT AREA
Approximately 8 incs wide
LCP 12 . . . . . RCP 20

ROTATIONAL CONVERSION
pickup differences for wheels 3, 2, 1
*unable to reliably determine*

READINGS
RIGHT contact point ONLY
...taken in tenths every 2 incs

BINDING ORDER
1 - 2 - 3
UNKNOWN COMBO
L49 - R99 - L33

Let's get spinnin'! As always, my initial free-spin is recreated through graphing.
Though these graphs portray a clean, straight forward opening - don't be fooled.

The gravity driven fence made for very subtle contact points. It's funny, whenever
I think I've finally cultivated this insanely light touch... an old lock comes along and
thoroughly humbles me, lol. Now, as I spin this lock the CP's seem quite apparent,
but it really took some time & effort at first to get acclimated to the feel of this lock.

My approach now days nearly always consists of an all wheels rotation. L or R is the only question.
Here I began with left rotation. A 7 inc. wide area (46-53) appears and true center (49.5) is chosen.

Image

AWL @ 49.5 . . . 20
L49.5 L49.5 R40 . . . . . 20
L49.5 R40 L49.5 . . . . . 20
R40 L49.5 L49.5 . . . . 20.4

pictured above-- My low test (40) strongly indicates w1 with 4/10 difference.
not pictured-- A high test (60) also pointed to w1, but with only 2/10 change.

Always a nice surprise when wheel 1 is found first.
The 'rotisserie' of the wheel pack... "set it and forget it"

L49.5 - :???: - :???:

Image

Again, I run multiple wheels whenever possible. Leaving w1 at its' known gate, I run 2&3 together.
Tedious precision and patience pays off. A gate spanning from 1 - 96 emerges. True center: 98.5

1 @ L49.5 ... 2&3 @ R98.5 . . . 19.6
L49.5 R98.5 L10 . . . . . 19.6
L49.5 L10 R98.5 . . . . . 19.8

L49.5 R98.5 R90 . . . . . 19.6
L49.5 R90 R98.5 . . . . . 19.8

Both high & low tests vary by 2/10 and unanimously point at wheel 2.
But I'm not thoroughly convinced. I decide to confirm it through isolation.
L49.5 - AR - L49.5
I bring only w2 through the area in question while parking 1&3 @ L49.5
The gate appears just as it did in the graph above. No doubt remains.

L49.5 - R98.5 - :???:

Time to run w3 for the money. Not long after skipping over the forbidden zone
and the fence drops in. Always such a sweet feeling that just never gets old :D

Image

OPEN: L49.5 - R98.5 - L30

What a pleasure this has been. Thanks again Eric.
You sir, are a gentleman and a scholar.
:salute:
" Enjoy the journey AS MUCH as the destination."
<<

Riyame

Keeper of the Bests / Supreme Overlord of Small Format Interchangeable Picking Nightmares

Posts: 2081

Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:16 pm

Location: Canada

Post Fri Jun 19, 2015 5:54 am

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Haha, amazing work. Very beautiful stand as well. I am glad that you were able to get it working so well.

You are correct that the gates have been filed. Originally they would have looked similar to this.
Image
PhoneMan: I always knew I'd say something stupid and it would be someone's sig
macgng: i am an equal opportunity pervert
macgng: aww fuck thats goin in someone sig :-(

If life gives you melons, you might be dyslexic.
<<

Papa Gleb

User avatar

Contributor
Contributor

Posts: 1108

Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2014 5:10 pm

Location: Brooklyn, NY

Post Fri Jun 19, 2015 2:46 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Drool, lots and lots of DROOLLLLL!!!!
Great addition to this spectacular thread.
<<

Altashot

Active Member

Posts: 423

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 2:32 am

Location: Western Canada

Post Fri Jun 19, 2015 8:33 pm

Re: Oldfast: Safe Chronicles

Beautiful work there Oldfast!
I really like that dial and ring, it cleaned up nice.

We never really discussed how you got the cam back to flat.
You did a really good job on it so, how did you do it?

M.
PreviousNext

Return to Safes, Strongboxes & Combination Locks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot]

Don't forget to visit our sponsors for all of your lockpicking needs!
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Grop
"CA Black" theme designed by stsoftware